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Gestational Hypertension: How Slow Breathing And Relaxing Music Can Help.

Gestational Hypertension How Slow Breathing And Relaxing Music Can Help.

Slow Breathing And Relaxing Music Benefits

Pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, often called gestational hypertension, affects a small number of expectant mothers.

The condition differs from chronic hypertension in that it occurs only during pregnancy and is usually caused by it.

In most cases, it’s not dangerous but around 1 in 4 women with gestational hypertension go on to develop a much more dangerous condition called preeclampsia.

So it’s very important to deal with gestational hypertension, though options are limited when powerful medications are the last thing an expectant mother wants!

Even when hypertension is not a factor, pregnancy can be an extremely difficult and demanding time, both physically and emotionally.

The ups and downs of surging hormones are well known, as well as the many physical discomforts of carrying.

On top of all the usual stress, many women feel guilty over their painful emotions because they fear that their baby feels everything they do.

So anything that can genuinely lower blood pressure and relieve stress during pregnancy could be a godsend for many mothers-to-be. And slow breathing with music may be just the thing.

The secret behind the effectiveness of this new technique is the combination of the two therapeutic tools it’s known by.

Pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, often called gestational hypertension, affects a small number of expectant mothers. The condition differs from chronic hypertension in that it is occurs only during pregnancy and is usually caused by it. In most cases it’s not dangerous but around 1 in 4 women with gestational hypertension go on to develop a much more dangerous condition called preeclampsia.

Pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, often called gestational hypertension, affects a small number of expectant mothers. The condition differs from chronic hypertension in that it is occurs only during pregnancy and is usually caused by it. In most cases it’s not dangerous but around 1 in 4 women with gestational hypertension go on to develop a much more dangerous condition called preeclampsia.

Simple relaxation tapes using soothing music or nature sounds have been around for ages but these offer a passive listening experience only.

By contrast, slow breathing with music integrates a guided breathing soundtrack with relaxing music.

The breathing pattern and rate is clinically proven to lower high blood pressure. The listener simply synchronizes her breathing with the soundtrack, eliminating the distraction created by counting or following some other timekeeper.

This happens naturally and effortlessly and allows for total relaxation with the music.

Of course, breathing has special significance for both the mother and her baby in the womb.

Special breathing exercises have long been taught for both stress relief and relaxation during pregnancy as well as for helping to ease the way in childbirth.

For the baby, the sound and rhythm of the mother’s breathing form a central part of her universe.

Like being rocked by the waves of a primordial sea, the gentle rise and fall of its mother’s breathing is an eternal comfort.

By contrast, rapid breathing may be cause for alarm, especially if accompanied by other stressful signals.

This makes slow breathing with music an ideal aide to turn to during pregnancy and after at any time of stress and/or high blood pressure.

Within minutes of starting, the soothing music will have its effect and your rapid breathing will synchronize with the slow rhythm of the soundtrack.

As the calming effects transfer to your baby, you become as one. In fact, why not place an extra headset on your belly and let your baby listen too?

Both slow breathing and relaxing music have benefits of their own but together they become much more than just the sum of two parts.

Fifteen minutes a day is proven to lower blood pressure while the combined benefits could be a lifesaver in a difficult pregnancy.