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Flying While Pregnant in First Trimester

Flying While Pregnant in First Trimester

Flying while pregnant is usually best left until the second trimester when there is no risk of miscarriage, no risk of labor, and no (or reduced) morning sickness.

However, we don’t always have the foresight to know exactly when we get pregnant and it shouldn’t stop you from living your life normally in the meantime.

This means some of us to find out we are pregnant when we are about to jet off somewhere and it can be very distressing when you don’t know what to do.

Firstly, try not to worry about it. You don’t need to cancel your flight plans when you find out you are pregnant, many people travel whilst pregnant and there is no link between flying while pregnant and miscarriage.

Stress and tension, however, can be harmful to you and your baby so try to stay calm and relaxed.

If you are uncomfortable on planes, to begin with, you should perhaps consider rescheduling or canceling your flight as giving yourself any unnecessary stress may be harmful.

Flying while pregnant is usually best left until the second trimester when there is no risk of miscarriage, no risk of labor, and no (or reduced) morning sickness. Firstly, try not to worry about it. You don’t need to cancel your flight plans when you find out you are pregnant, many people travel whilst pregnant and there is no link between flying while pregnant and miscarriage.

Flying while pregnant is usually best left until the second trimester when there is no risk of miscarriage, no risk of labor, and no (or reduced) morning sickness. Firstly, try not to worry about it. You don’t need to cancel your flight plans when you find out you are pregnant, many people travel whilst pregnant and there is no link between flying while pregnant and miscarriage.

During the first trimester of your pregnancy, the biggest issues will be nausea and fatigue.

Morning sickness can make a plane ride very uncomfortable and distressing so if you are suffering from morning sickness or even if you suffer from travel sickness you should consider asking the airline for a seat near the middle of the plane over the wing.

This area provides the smoothest ride and will reduce your risk of nausea on the journey.

With fatigue, you mustn’t sleep for long periods on the plane. Pregnant women have an increased risk of DVT so ensure you get up regularly and move about the plane to stretch out your limbs and to keep your circulation running smoothly.

It may seem rude of people to get on and off without letting you get up or go sit down first but to ensure you don’t have any long periods of standing make sure you disembark or get on the plane last.

This will allow everyone to get on or off the plane first and you can then go straight to your seat without the fear of being pushed around or standing up for too long.

Ask the flight attendant for extra sick bags just in case, they should be able to provide you with two or three just in case you get sick along the way.

Some airline flight attendants can be very considerate and will check up on you from time to time and look after you during the journey.

To help settle your stomach pack some light snacks such as crackers or an apple. Avoid heavy foods such as greasy fast food or large meals before traveling.

Your doctor may wish to refer you to a medical professional to look after you while you are on holiday.

If they do, make sure you keep the contact details of this professional close to hand throughout your journey. You will not need a pre-natal chart with you if traveling in your first trimester.